Finding Aid / Kariye Camii / Margaret Alexander / Processing

New Finding Aids from ICFA

Banner New Finding Aids

The Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) is pleased to announce the publication of four (4) new finding aids. To view the complete PDF finding aids, click on the thumbnail at the top of the following collection-level records in our online inventory, AtoM@DO. You can also check under the “Finding Aids” field for the direct links.

These collections document various fieldwork and research projects, relating to Roman and Late Antique pavement mosaics, Byzantine sites in Greece and Turkey, and Coptic architectural sculpture from Oxyrhynchos.

The first collection documents the fieldwork of the Corpus des Mosaїques de Tunisie team, co-directed by Margaret Alexander. The CMT’s investigations and publications on the  floor mosaics in Utique, Thuburbo Majus, El Jem, and Carthage in Tunisia occurred between 1967 and the 1990s. The collecton also records Alexander’s research interests as a Ph.D. candidate in the 1950s and the materials on “Early Christian Tomb Mosaics of North Africa.”

The second collection documents Edward Eliopoulos’s fieldwork in Mani, Greece, between 1958 and 1980. During this time, Eliopoulos produced approximately 199 photographic prints that record middle Byzantine churches, their architecture, and the surrounding landscape in Mani.

The third collection features Josephine M. Harris’s photographic documentation and catalog of Coptic architectural sculpture from Oxyrhynchos, specifically block fragments that are now housed in the Graeco-Roman Museum in Alexandria, Egypt. The materials date from the 1950s to 1970s, when Harris was focused on determining the chronology of the fragments and the development of their “stylistic features” within the larger scope of Coptic and Byzantine architectural sculpture.

Hagia Sophia Scaffold

Left: Charles Tauss and Betty Spitz gazing up at the scaffolding in the east arch of Hagia Sophia, 1989 (MS.BZ.011); Right: Tauss’s notes for the proposed conservation of the partially uncovered mosaics in the east arch of Hagia Sophia, 1989 (MS.BZ.011).

Lastly, the fourth collection contains administrative and photographic documentation for the wall painting conservation conducted by Charles Tauss and his assistant Betty Spitz at the Kariye Camii in Istanbul, Turkey between 1984 and 1989. The materials also reference proposed work at the Hagia Sophia Museum to clean and conserve mosaics in the eastern arch and includes Tauss’s master’s thesis, “The Church of Christ in Chora (Kariyeh Djami): Notes on the Parecclesion,” written for his graduate degree at the Yale University School of Art in 1955.

Of course, none of the processing and description for ICFA’s collections would be possible without our dedicated and resourceful assistants and interns, whom we would like to thank for their hard work and dedication:

  • Jonathan Warner (Intern, September-December 2011), Robin Pokorski (Intern, January-April 2012), and Kelly Hughes (Intern, September 2012-August 2013) for the Margaret Alexander Papers and Records of the Corpus des Mosaïques de Tunisie, 1948-2003.
  • Jessica Cebra (ICFA Departmental Assistant) for the Edward Eliopoulos Photographs of Mani, Greece, 1958-1980, and Charles Tauss Papers and Records of the Kariye Camii Museum Project, ca. 1955-1990s.
  • Alison Miner (Intern, September-December 2012) and Cebra for the Josephine M. Harris Research Papers and Photographs on Coptic Architectural Sculpture from Oxyrhynchos, ca. 1950s-1970s.
Basilica di San Marco, Venice, Italy. The Story of Noah: The Flood. Photographer: Ekkehard Ritter. 1970s.

Basilica di San Marco, Venice, Italy. The Story of Noah: The Flood. Photographer: Ekkehard Ritter. 1970s (MS.BZ.009).

Since our last announcement of published finding aids in August 2014, ICFA staff have continued to work on processing our collections and improving the descriptive metadata in our finding aids in order to make our holdings more discoverable, usable, and accessible to our users. Currently, we are finalizing the processing of two other collections that were created by recognized Byzantine scholars: Corpus for Wall Mosaics in the North Adriatic Area, ca. 1974-1990s (MS.BZ.009) and the Ernst Kitzinger Research Papers and Photographs, 1940s-1980s (MS.BZ.016). The first collection primarily contains research materials and photographic documentation of mosaics in the Basilica di San Marco and similar churches in the North Adriatic area. It documents the collaborative project between Otto Demus, Irina Andreescu-Treadgold, Ekkehard Ritter, Ernest Hawkins, Rudolf Kloos, and other team members between 1974 and 1979. The second collection also focuses on mosaics and records Ernst Kitzinger’s fieldwork project to survey the 12th century Norman mosaics in Sicily during the 1950s. Additional information and more detailed description for these collections will be forthcoming.

In addition, we are improving and cleaning up our legacy metadata, and to start this large-scale project, we are focusing on the photographic material of five (5) renowned Byzantine scholars: Cyril Mango, Marlia Mango, Thomas F. Mathews, Ihor Ševčenko, and Nancy Ševčenko. With this effort, we plan to virtually reunite the physically separated but related collection items, determine their copyright status, and enhance their findability by incorporating the legacy metadata into our collection management system, AtoM@DO. We have also completed the digitization for William Earl Betsch Photographs of Architectural Capitals in Istanbul, 1970 (PH.BZ.002). The digital surrogates for Betsch’s negatives will also be added in AtoM@DO, and they will surely complement a related collection in ICFA, Nicholas V. Artamonoff Photographs of Istanbul and Turkey, 1935-1945 (PH.BZ.010). Thus, you can expect to see more and more content in AtoM@DO in the coming months – so stay tuned!

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